The IBM PC

Love the background :-)

Processor Intel 8088 4.77mhz
Type of BUS 8-bit ISA
Memory (Min/Max) 16k/640k
Display MDA/CGA
Announce date August 12, 1981
List price $3285.00

 

Note: Some Switch blocks are labeled ON and OFF; others are labeled ON and OPEN. OPEN is the off position. On my drawings ON is always up. This example shows switch block 1(SW1) with Switches 3 and 4 in an off position. This is the factory settings and should not be changed.
Switch block 2 (SW2) with it's factory jumpers. As above DON'T move these switches. Note 6-7-8 are all in the off position.

Motherboard layout

Coprocessor(SW1)

With Coprocessor
Without Coprocessor

Memory(SW2)

16-64k
96k
128k
160k
192k
224k
256k
288k
320k
352k
384k
416k
448k
480k
512k
544k
576k
608k
640k

Display(SW1)

EGA or NO adapter at all
CGA 40X25
CGA 80X25
No video / Other adapter

Disk Drives(SW1)

One disk drive
Two disk drives
Three disk drives
four disk drives

Here is my ibm pc. This one uses the 64k-256k motherboard. While mine shipped with 64k some shipped with a little as 16k. This system is far from original though and has been upgraded in several ways.
Looking inside we find a full house. Everything is full. Good thing the pc dose not generate much heat as airflow has been restricted with all those upgrades.
This is one of the most common upgrades for the pc/xt. It's a ast six pack plus. It added up to 384k of ram / a real time clock (RTC) / And 3 i/o ports. A serial and parallel port was on another bracket but I could not use it as my system was full.
Here we have the video card. This was something I added because it detects the monitor you use so you can't have to open up the system when you switch monitors. It supports up to an ega monitor. A parallel port was also provided.
Next we have a real nice addition to and pc. It's a hard card. basically a hard card was a hard drive and it's controller built onto a single card. This was a real nice idea as it also made copying large files a snap. Just get a spare hard card and use it like a large floppy drive.
Here we have something that was once a good idea but today has little practical use. This card I like though as the cpu is a socketed 286 and that can be upgraded to a 486. I'll write a new review on how to do that later. To use this upgrade you had to remove your original cpu and install that onto the card. You then ran the ribbon cable to the cpu socket. The switch in back allowed you to switch between the 8088 and 286 cpu's. You had to reboot to switch cpu's.
Here we have a standard ibm floppy drive controller. The massive connector on the back was for external drives.
Finally we have the mainboard/motherboard. You can tell the ibm pc from the ibm xt by the two black connectors in back (the xt lacks the cassette port) and but the number of expansion slots (5=pc 8=xt).
Here is the lable inside my pc. This has to be one of the last made because the xt was already shipping by this time.